Collaborative idea generation for ELT

Archive for July, 2011

Catch up

I’m on holiday next week, so I’m posting this now instead of Wednesday as I normally do. Next week is your chance to catch up with Infinite ELT Ideas and post on any of the prompts that you haven’t yet.

How about:

Looking forward to reading your ideas!

 

Tweet Modern

A few weeks ago Stephen Fry posted the following tweet:

Stephen Fry tweet

This led me to a very funny set of pictures based on unusual tweets, where an artist has created his interpretation of the tweets. The copyright belongs to Nick Hilditch (this is used with his permission). It is part of a project called irkafirka. Here is one example:

tweet modern

What would you do with this set of pictures in your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context they are used in. Post your ideas in the comments below. There are no wrong answers!

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.

Quizlet

Quizlet.com is a site where you can create sets of flashcards for your students. They can look at them online or on their smartphones. They can even print them.

Quizlet homepage

What would you do with it in your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context it is used in. Post your ideas in the comments below. There are no wrong answers!

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.

The Unbearable Lightness of Being in Aberystwyth

This quote is taken from p181-182 of The Unbearable Lightness of Being in Aberystwyth by Malcolm Pryce.

‘I do like to keep a clean house, if that’s what you mean.’ She took the fiver. ‘It’s the little things like that that make the difference, isn’t it? A dirty keyhole is like grime on the cuffs, or not polishing the heels as well as the toes. A dead giveaway.’

‘That’s what I thought.’

‘Sometimes you can’t help but hear what goes on.’

‘Exactly.’

‘Even when you’d really rather not. But what choice do you have? You can’t close your ears like you can close your eyes, can you?’

‘So what did they talk about?’

What would you do with this dialogue in your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context it is used in. Post your ideas in the comments below. All of the formatting is copied from the original text.

The Wikipedia page about the author is here and the Amazon link to the book is here.

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.