Collaborative idea generation for ELT

Archive for December, 2011

Christmas catch-up

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Image by @sandymillin on eltpics

Like many, I am now on my Christmas break. That means I have lots of time to blog and catch up with what everyone else has been writing. Or not.

Whatever you’re doing this Christmas, I’m sending out my best wishes to you for now and the New Year. I hope you have a wonderful time with your nearest and dearest, whether or not you celebrate Christmas.

And if you do have a few minutes to spare, why not take a look at some of the old Infinite ELT Ideas posts, and see if you can offer up/use any sugeestions for them. Looking forward to seeing your ideas!

Sandy

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BBC Close Up videos

The BBC have produced a series of short videos, each of less than 5 minutes, showcasing unsual aspects of cultures from around the world. They are called Close Up and are described like this:

This BBC News series focuses on aspects of life in countries and cities around the world. What may seem ordinary and familiar to the people who live there can be surprising to those who do not.

Some of the topics covered so far include:

What would you do with these videos in your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context they are used in. Post your ideas in the comments below. All ideas are welcome (there are no wrong answers!)

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.

Did you know? Crash statistics in the UK

BBC crash statistics screen shot

The above screenshot is taken from a series of slides showing very comprehensive crash statistics on UK roads over the period 1999-2010. Click on the image to be taken to the original set of statistics.

It is a set of quite sobering data, and one which I feel could promote a lot of discussions in your classes, if you feel the students are able to deal with what could potentially be quite a difficult topic.

The statistical nature of the information would make it particularly suitable for academic English/IELTS students, though of course it could be adapted for use with any students.

What would you do with these statistics in your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context they are used in. Post your ideas in the comments below. All ideas are welcome (there are no wrong answers!)

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.