Collaborative idea generation for ELT

Posts tagged ‘comparatives’

The perfect woman

Esther Honig

Esther Honig

Esther Honig is a human interest reporter. As part of a project called ‘Before and After’, she sent the image above to photo editors around the world, along with a simple request: “Make me look beautiful”. The results are a fascinating insight into what ‘beautiful’ really means around the world. You can see all of the images on Honig’s website.

What would you do with these photos in your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context they are used in. Post your ideas in the comments below. All ideas are welcome (there are no wrong answers!)

Thanks to my mum, Kate Millin, for sending me this.

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.

 

Dear Photograph

Described in a quote as “digital nostalgia of the highest order”, Dear Photograph asks users to submit photographs of them holding old photos in front of the same place now. Here’s one example:

Dear photograph example

(There are no copyright notices on the site, but if anyone connected to it needs me to edit this, please let me know)

What would you do with this site in your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context it is used in. Post your ideas in the comments below. All ideas are welcome (there are no wrong answers!)

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.

I found this website when it was tweeted by Feed the Teacher.

What people eat around the world

Jamie Keddie tweeted this link on Twitter a couple of weeks ago. It’s a set of pictures published by Time magazine showing families from around the family with all of the food they eat in a week laid out around them. The pictures are absolutely fascinating, not just because of the food but also because of where the photos are taken, and I think would make a really rich source of material for your classroom. They are taken from the book Hungry Planet by Peter Menzel and Faith D’Aluisio.

Hungry Planet book cover

What would you do with these pictures in your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context they are used in. Post your ideas in the comments below. All ideas are welcome (there are no wrong answers!)

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.