Collaborative idea generation for ELT

Posts tagged ‘exam practice’

Holstee Manifesto

The Holstee Manifesto was put together in summer 2009 by Mike, Fabian and Dave, the founders of fashion company Holstee, to embody what they wanted from life, and what they believed their designs should incorporate.

Holstee Manifesto

The original poster was also accompanied by this video:

There is already an excellent lesson plan at film-english, but I thought I might throw it out there and see what you guys can do with it too 🙂

What would you do with this manifesto in your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context it is used in. Post your ideas in the comments below. All ideas are welcome (there are no wrong answers!)

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.

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Did you know? Crash statistics in the UK

BBC crash statistics screen shot

The above screenshot is taken from a series of slides showing very comprehensive crash statistics on UK roads over the period 1999-2010. Click on the image to be taken to the original set of statistics.

It is a set of quite sobering data, and one which I feel could promote a lot of discussions in your classes, if you feel the students are able to deal with what could potentially be quite a difficult topic.

The statistical nature of the information would make it particularly suitable for academic English/IELTS students, though of course it could be adapted for use with any students.

What would you do with these statistics in your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context they are used in. Post your ideas in the comments below. All ideas are welcome (there are no wrong answers!)

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.

Plinky prompts

Who brings out the best in you?

If you had the attention of the entire world for two minutes, what would you say?

Name your favourite old movie.

Does silence make you feel uncomfortable?

All of these questions were taken from Plinky.com, a site which is linked to wordpress and is designed to give you inspiration for your blog. Whenever you post something on wordpress, three or four questions appear on the right-hand side of the screen to suggest what you could write about next, and (I believe) these are taken from Plinky too. You can read people’s answers to the questions by visiting the site.

Wordpress prompts

Examples of WordPress prompts

What would you do with this website or these writing prompts in your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context they are used in. Post your ideas in the comments below. All ideas are welcome (there are no wrong answers!)

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.

20 Phrasal Verbs

Gordon Scruton sent me this tweet last week:

The link took me to his blog, about an interesting lesson based on the 20 most common phrasal verbs in English. The list he based the lesson on came from the Learn English from Home blog, and I have copied it below.

bring up, carry on, chase up, come across, come up with, fall apart, get along, get away with, get over, give up, go on, hold on, look after, look up, make out, pull over, put down, put off, turn up, watch out. (Click here for the original article with explanations)

So, what would you do with this list of phrasal verbs in class? Take a look at Gordon’s lesson for a bit of inspiration, and let’s help him out with some more ideas 🙂 You can make any assumptions you like about the context they are used in. There are no wrong answers…

Click here to find out more about the idea behind this blog.

A fish

What would you do with this fish in your classroom? It’s about 15cm in diameter and fits comfortably into an adult hand.

You can make any assumptions you like about the context it is used in. Post your ideas in the comments below.

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.