Collaborative idea generation for ELT

Posts tagged ‘reading’

Scale of the Universe

The Scale of the Universe

Chris Wilson recommended an amazing tool called ‘The Scale of the Universe’. It starts off at human scale, and you can zoom in and zoom out to the extremes of the scale of the universe.

What would you do with this tool in your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context it is used in. Post your ideas in the comments below. All ideas are welcome (there are no wrong answers!)

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.

Travel Etiquette: Food and Drink

Travel etiquette is something which often appears in coursebooks. It’s a rich topic for discussion. This article from Lonely Planet has lots of tips about table manners around the world, some of which are ‘corrected’ in the comments below.

Table manners

What would you do with this article in your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context it is used in. Post your ideas in the comments below. All ideas are welcome (there are no wrong answers!)

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.

John Fairfax, Who Rowed Across Oceans, Dies at 74

This week’s prompt was suggested by Alan Tait on Twitter.

John Fairfax

It’s an obituary for John Fairfax, the first man to row solo across the Atlantic, and with his girlfriend, one of the first people to row across the Pacific. He was a man who sought adventure because it was there and he could.

What would you do with this obituary in your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context it is used in. Post your ideas in the comments below. All ideas are welcome (there are no wrong answers!)

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.

Did you know? Crash statistics in the UK

BBC crash statistics screen shot

The above screenshot is taken from a series of slides showing very comprehensive crash statistics on UK roads over the period 1999-2010. Click on the image to be taken to the original set of statistics.

It is a set of quite sobering data, and one which I feel could promote a lot of discussions in your classes, if you feel the students are able to deal with what could potentially be quite a difficult topic.

The statistical nature of the information would make it particularly suitable for academic English/IELTS students, though of course it could be adapted for use with any students.

What would you do with these statistics in your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context they are used in. Post your ideas in the comments below. All ideas are welcome (there are no wrong answers!)

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.

A free newspaper

As far as I know, most countries in Europe now have free newspapers available. Outside Europe, I’m not really sure, but feel free to let us know.

The most popular one is the Metro in the UK and the Czech Republic:

Here is a link to the UK website.

What would you do with one of these papers in your classroom, whether in English or not? You can make any assumptions you like about the context it is used in. Post your ideas in the comments below. All ideas are welcome (there are no wrong answers!)

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.

Roald Dahl

I picked up this bookmark on a recent visit to the Seven Stories museum of children’s books with Lizzie Pinard. We spent a brilliant two hours there, and I would highly recommend it to anyone in or around Newcastle-upon-Tyne, UK.

Roald Dahl bookmark

How would you use this bookmark in your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context it is used in. Post your ideas in the comments below. All ideas are welcome (there are no wrong answers!)

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.

Your local area

Just a phrase this week:

your local area

That’s it.
What would you do with your local area in and out of your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context it is used in. Post your ideas in the comments below. All ideas are welcome (there are no wrong answers!)

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.

The Unbearable Lightness of Being in Aberystwyth

This quote is taken from p181-182 of The Unbearable Lightness of Being in Aberystwyth by Malcolm Pryce.

‘I do like to keep a clean house, if that’s what you mean.’ She took the fiver. ‘It’s the little things like that that make the difference, isn’t it? A dirty keyhole is like grime on the cuffs, or not polishing the heels as well as the toes. A dead giveaway.’

‘That’s what I thought.’

‘Sometimes you can’t help but hear what goes on.’

‘Exactly.’

‘Even when you’d really rather not. But what choice do you have? You can’t close your ears like you can close your eyes, can you?’

‘So what did they talk about?’

What would you do with this dialogue in your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context it is used in. Post your ideas in the comments below. All of the formatting is copied from the original text.

The Wikipedia page about the author is here and the Amazon link to the book is here.

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.

Alice’s Bucket List

Screenshot from Alice's bucket list blog (click on the picture to go to the blog)

I just came across this blog today via my flatmate and @neilhimself (Neil Gaiman) on Twitter. Click on the picture to access the blog (I can’t embed it here due to WordPress restrictions). It’s very emotional and I think it could create a lot of discussion and ideas in class. If you have any ideas how to help Alice achieve any of the things on her bucket list, you could contact her and let her know.

What would you do with this blog in your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context it is used in. Post your ideas in the comments below.

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.

Unshelved

Unshelved cartoon: there are two kinds of people

(c) Bill Barnes & Gene Ambaum Unshelved.com Used with permission

This is a cartoon strip from a series called Unshelved set in a library. I particularly like them as my mum is a librarian and my first job was a library assistant.

What would you do with this cartoon in your classroom? You can make any assumptions you like about the context it is used in. Post your ideas in the comments below.

Click here to find out the idea behind this blog.